Finally…MBA clicks!


I have not been blogging for a while now. The reason partly lies in the fact that I have been keeping busy, partly in the writer’s block, but mostly in the lack of interesting content. And what do I end up finding interesting enough to write? Surprisingly, its “corporate concepts”: the click that happens that one fine day on campus during placement season, when all your academic curriculum becomes far more inviting, since it seems that your salary would be directly proportional to the concepts, theories and big words you know.

Here is my take-

  1. Be honest. To yourself. If a company’s culture does not match the behavioral tendencies you have, don’t take the fall. Especially if you are a fresher, like me. Think about it- At the end of a year, we would be so disillusioned because of the mismatch that we’ll have a jaded opinion of the entire Corporate World. Take time… Wait… for the right fit to come along. Don’t compromise on the part that has the potential to make 80% of your life either unbearable or absolutely fun. As my favorite professor once said, “nothing good happens fast”
    (Late Prof. Deven Dhanak)

     

  2. Focus on them. Whether you are selling a product, a service, your services, or recommendations- focus on the “them” aspect of the negotiation rather than the “I” or the “It”. It is about their interests, their win, and their satisfaction. I don’t mean that you allow yourself to loose in the process, but I realize that when the focus is on them, you inherently come up with simple win-win situations. (Prof. )

     

     

  3. Flow charting. I realize that this might not be a viable option for all concerned, but flow charting makes decision making a breeze, and I am not talking only professionally. When asked a question, or posed with a problem: look at all the aspects, think of the framework, the structure (type of flow chart) to answer that question. Always bind the answer in numbers. E.g.: 2 aspects, 5 concerns, 2 solutions etc. Write it down, if necessary. (Even in an interview)

     

  4. Keep it short. This is one
    of those things that I can only preach about and hope someday I’ll be able to implement. Stop being verbose, stop beating around the bush, and stop jazzing and faffing (the MS word does not recognize this word, hope you do). Anyway, I have yet to learn the art and skill of keeping a conversation short and simple. Fumbling for the right words, inadvertently misrepresenting facts for lack of proper vocabulary and wasting someone else’s time and yours, besides cutting a sorry figure are some of the repercussions of not keeping it short!

     

    That’s about it for now. I shall share some trivia from any learning at the manufacturing concern I am doing my live project with. And the blunders I have made at my many unsuccessful interview processes in a bit. Till then, if you are a student: know that I am not an expert at successful corporate communications! I am just a 22 year old unemployed female trying to make sense of the corporate jungle one baby step at a time.

    If you are a recruiter and this captures your interest, drop in a comment and I shall be on cloud 9!!

     

    I have a feeling this blog might turn into just another management blog. Hope that does not happen- neither the “just another” aspect; nor the “management” aspect.

    Let the Wackiness never end!

     

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